Project Description

The following suggestions are drawn from best practice in our Catholic schools.  Schools may find them worth replicating.

TE TŪTAKI KI A TE KARAITI / ENCOUNTER WITH CHRIST

  • A number of parents and families have become baptised, and there are whanau in school supporting other whanau in the RCIA programme. People feel supported in a safe, inclusive and non-judgemental community which allows them to explore, reconnect with or deepen their faith.
  • Students preparing for the sacraments of initiation are linked with an older student who is already attending Mass in the student’s home parish.
  • Gathering to pray is the main way of facilitating an encounter with Christ, for staff as well as students; if each person present has a clear understanding of why they gather – as members of a faith community, rather than “because it’s the way we start the day/lesson” – the encounter becomes deeper and more meaningful. An awareness and practice of varied forms of prayer – Lectio Divina, silent contemplative prayer, meditation using a prayer mantra – is to be encouraged.
  • Once children complete the Sacramental programme they are invited to become altar servers. Parents who show an interest in the faith are referred to the Priest in Residence who runs a Faith Formation programme for them. At the start of the each year all staff attend a staff day on Catholic Special Character and RE teaching.
  • The principal and Board have developed a faith-based staff code of conduct and this initiative and its process has been a powerful tool in establishing a concrete way of safeguarding and strengthening the school’s Catholic Character. The process included extensive staff consultation and promotion with the community. The Code is based on the expectation that all staff exhibit Gospel values in their day to day professional interactions.
  • The Campus Minister is studying the role of spirituality in youth development as part of a Master’s degree in social work. She is a deeply faith-filled young woman who describes the ministry component of her role as building relationships with students and accompanying them on their faith journey.  She talks about how to pray, and helps them to understand some Church teachings which can be seen as a barrier to faith.  She is a familiar presence in the playground at break times, with small groups and individual students.
  • The induction session for new parents includes a Mass which they and their daughters, as well as other family members, attend. This Mass is said by the the College Chaplan who provides a “walk –through” for unchurched families, which helps to encourage attendance at Sunday Mass. The same kind of “teachable/evangelising moments” during Mass are included in the Grandparents’ Mass.
  • The central and inviting sacred space provides a retreat for quiet reflection and prayer. Senior students called this a place for “moments of silence”, “one to one time with God”, and “feeling the presence of God.” Staff noted that whānau are often there in quiet contemplation as they await the release of their children from class.
  • Senior students advise that the school encourages the growth in faith of their whānau and themselves “by having moments to talk and be with God”,” teaching us that we can be like God and Jesus”, “helping us to relate to God, teaching us to pray”.
  • Teachers are strong vehicles for evangelisation and show how an integration of faith and life is achieved. They show this by “ Encouraging our children to have a relationship with God,” “I have a role sharing the faith with students and helping them on their faith journey,” “Modelling how to live as a Christian… the way I interact with students, staff and community,” “Being a living role model in my own faith journey – seeking to grow my own faith,” “Being an active participant in parish events and roles.”

TE WHAKATUPU MĀ TE MĀTAURANGA / GROWTH IN KNOWLEDGE

  • Staff who are new to teaching Religious Education are not expected to teach Religious Education or lead prayer by themselves immediately; they are involved in the planning, but a team teaching approach allows the new teacher to work alongside an experienced teacher in Religious Education and prayer. When the experienced teacher feels they are ready, the new teacher takes the lead with the other teacher still involved until such time as both feel confident that Religious Education and prayer can be taught and facilitated appropriately and strongly.
  • The Senior Leadership Team is committed to further articulation of a Catholic world view in assemblies, and to providing connections for Year 13 students with guest speakers from Catholic organisations in order to keep them involved after leaving school.
  • Teachers are collegial and collaborative. They plan in teaching teams, sharing ideas and activities. Each team has at least one experienced RE teacher who holds a S464 position. This provides extra support and guidance for those new to Catholic education and teaching the curriculum. Teachers share their faith journey and perspectives to model and link ideas between faith and life.
  • There is a focus on the affective domain or spiritual formation within teaching and learning. The DRS and RE support teacher facilitate professional learning and formation around this. Teachers transpose the ideas into the teaching practice by identifying affective domain reflections and evaluations for the class.  Evaluation data is collected from students and this is useful in examining the effectiveness of spiritual formation programmes.
  • A Catholic perspective is intentionally embedded into the inquiry and thematic areas of the curriculum. Teachers begin by brainstorming the links between the topic, Scripture and Catholic understanding including the principles of Catholic social teaching. The DRS advised that “this means we are seeing things and helping our children to see things through Catholic eyes”. An example was a sustainability unit where stewardship of creation and Laudato Si’ were integrated. The DRS also advised that a ”previous unit on inventors was planned to allow for reflection on the purposes of inventions – how can we invent things that are for the good of all people especially the poor and vulnerable?” This is the nature of Catholic education that: “As an ecclesial entity the Catholic school reflects the nature of the Church. It proclaims the word of God in its programmes and activities.” (The Catholic Education of School Age Children (NZCBC, 2014, pg 4)

TE WHAKAATU KARAITIANA / CHRISTIAN WITNESS

  • The teacher appraisal system is very well set up with each teacher developing a ‘Prayer’ goal and a ‘Religious Education’ goal.
  • A Gratitude Diary, is issued to every student in the school, and written in each day for five minutes after lunch each day. It includes a prayer as inspiration for a focus on the God-given gifts we have received; this prayer is also in the student diary. Pastoral Care prefects work closely with the Guidance Counsellors, and have taken the initiative this year to set up a “Games Room” where senior students are present at lunchtime to socialise with and offer support to students who appear lonely or not quite “fitting in”.
  • Parents named Jesus as the “why” behind the school’s values, and see the encounter with Him in being as Christ to to others, citing an incident at a hockey match where an opposing player was cared for when injured.
  • The school’s commitment to Te Tiriti o Waitangi is outlined in the Charter through the concepts of: manaakitanga (pastoral care), whanaungatanga (establishing links, making conncections and to the people one meets), ako (the reciprocal teaching and learning relationships), and mahi tahi (the unity of the group of people working towards a specific goal). These concepts were broken open by the staff to identify how they are witnessed and to find new opportunities for growth. The school is growing in its understanding of bi-culturalism and this is witnessed by: the Principal leading the local Māori Achievement Collaborative, The Board’s development work after breaking open the Hautū-Māori cultural responsiveness self-review tool for boards of trustees, the development of a small Māori advisory group identified for dialogue around issues, concerns and the way forward, staff professional learning formation in te reo and tikanga Māori through He Papa Tikanga, and working with Ngāti te Whiti hapū to name the school’s sacred space.

TE KAITIAKITANGA ME TO WHAKAPAKARI I TE TUAKIRI KATORIKA / SAFEGUARDING AND STRENGTHENING CATHOLIC CHARACTER

  • A comprehensive Catholic Special Character Report written by the Director of Religious Education is presented at each meeting of the Board of Trustees. These regular updates are supplemented by the Principal’s Report that highlights monthly updates to Catholic special character and Religious Education goals and strategies identified in the school’s Charter.  Furthermore, specific reports relating to the school’s internal self-review of the Catholic Special Character dimensions are presented.

PARISH

  • To re-enforce life in the school also means life in the parish whanau new to the school are welcomed at the next school/parish Mass by faith community, parish priest and principal. They are presented with a certificate of welcome and a Bible.
  • The principal, staff and board of trustees work to build strong relationships with families, the parish and wider community. The responsibility of being part of a parent, school and parish partnership is highlighted at all orientation, curriculum and RE meetings.
  • The Forming Faith Together Programme brings parish, parents and school together to discuss the role each has in the faith formation of the child.
  • Artwork from the school is displayed in the church foyer and parish lounge.
  • School and Parish Priest decide together what they value about the school involvement in liturgy and then make more effort to engage the children and parents.
  • Each class takes a turn as greeters at Sunday Mass.

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION

  • Written reports to whānau provide information on students’ key learning and knowledge from RE strand work as well as attitudes towards learning in RE.
  • There are no COL targets related specifically to Special Character, a participating teacher teaches RE, and the particular literacy emphasis on boys’ writing offers opportunities to use the RE programme as a vehicle.
  • The DRS provides an overview of the Sunday readings at Monday morning school assemblies, which is followed through with practical exercises in the classroom or by the children in their breaks or at home.
  • The DRS has developed a specialised RE induction programmes for non-Catholic students who come from other parts of the world.
  • Year 7-8 students are empowered to exercise leadership as liturgy leaders. They read the preceding Sunday’s Gospel and lead prayer related to that Gospel.
  • RE library books are available in the classrooms so students can access them during free reading time.
  • The RE faculty undertakes rigorous internal review and evidence from this assists the faculty in setting goals for development.
  • RE teachers gather data and uses it to identify strengths and needs within the junior classes so as to adjust RE lessons as needed.
  • RE teachers use assessment tasks in years 7-10 RE to measure understanding and identify gaps in learning before students reach year 11 and NCEA.
  • The Head of RE completes an annual faculty report that outlines achievement in RE at all levels, including a breakdown on Māori and Pasifika achievement.
  • The focus of current Religious Education topics is communicated to all in the community via the weekly newsletters.
  • The Principal presents a homily each Monday morning to the whole school in which he explains the previous Sunday Gospel in a way children understand.
  • The parish Priest joins classes for prayer.
  • A Jesus house has been created in the junior area for children to experience the life and times of Jesus.
  • The DRS leads a school-wide prayer programme based on the Gospel reading for the coming Sunday. Each day in prayer the weeks reading is broken down some more and reflected upon using a variety of strategies eg. Lectio Divina, prayer writing, artistic expression, mediation and creating drama responses.

PASTORAL

  • The concept of being one parish/school community is built by actively working to communicate this, e.g. the official welcome for new whānau being held within the parish Sunday Mass.
  • Continue to work with the parish to identify barriers and introduce ways that will encourage whānau to see that involvement in parish life provides a basis for their children’s own faith practices as teenagers and adults.
  • The HOD Health/PE takes the approach that spiritual health is part of the student’s identity, and stresses the importance of staying strong in one’s beliefs and values.
  • There is a comprehensive follow-up of school leavers and even after they have left the school, the Careers Adviser assists past students who are not in employment, education or training.
  • Prayer is rich with variety, engagement, ritual, reflection and is often student led. Teachers link prayers to key learning or topics such as Year of Mercy. Teachers foster development of student’s spirituality through a variety of experiences including modern forms of prayer.
  • A strong parish youth group ensures that the older youth continue to have a relationship with the school.
  • Extraordinary ministers of Holy Communion are trained. The procedure includes contact with the parish priest to ensure connection with the Eucharistic Community. The students can also be part of the ministry of the Word and the Eucharist in their parish.
  • The school is working with the parish to draw younger people into parish life. After Sunday Mass prefects share their faith journey and encourage a small number of younger students with theirs.
  • Library displays are linked to the current RE theme.
  • Catholic publications and books are set up in the school foyer on a bookrack. Parents are encouraged to borrow these to take home to read.
  • An oral language group is run for 4 year olds, which encourages links between parish and school.
  • A ‘Saint Start’ programme engages soon to be enrolled children and their parents into the life of the school. The parish catechist works with the parents on introducing them to the Catholic ethos of the school and provides a link to the parish.
  • All parents that enroll a child for the first time are visited by the parish priest or pastoral assistant.
  • The school has a strong transition to school programme. It builds working relationships with families prior to their children starting school. Starting with a parent morning where information is shared and staff introduced, a family pack is given consisting of a whanau book, rosary beads, prayer card, list of Sunday Mass and reconciliation times and contact details for the parish pastoral assistant.
  • New students are buddied with older students who look after them for the first two weeks to help them settle into playground culture.
  • Youth music groups encourage children to attend Mass by giving them a meaningful purpose.
  • A prayer table is displayed in the staffroom, including names of community members in need of prayers.
  • Any document with the principles of pastoral care is directed to both school and parish.
  • Liturgies and prayers are collated ready for use at the time of a death within the school community taking the stress out of preparation at this difficult time.
  • The school is sensitive toward less fortunate families and parishioners assist with donations etc.
  • Pastoral Care specific needs are discussed at all staff meetings. This community dimension of the life of the school fosters a commitment to the common good of all members of the school community.
  • Supporting children through Tear Fund – money is collected each morning at prayer time and when the children put it in the box they explain how they earned it.
  • The school supports an international Catholic organisation called ‘Mary’s Meals’ whose aim is to feed every child in the world one meal a day. The children are encouraged to understand how fortunate they are to have good food and to donate to this cause.

CATHOLIC CHARACTER

  • Integration of the Catholic Character of a school can be enhanced by establishing a Catholic Key principle before planning each topic unit. This can be from the Catholic social teaching principles, virtues or scripture. This key principle sits at the top of each unit plan and everything planned relates to it.
  • Use the preference criteria enrolment data to make a strategic goal and actions to further encourage all families with a Catholic connection to continue on their sacramental and faith journey. The parish must be part of this if an outcome is to be a greater involvement in the life of the parish.

SOCIAL JUSTICE

  • The understanding of Social Justice – centre the activities in a philosophical framework rather than being an end in themselves. For example a ‘whacky hair’ day was not for fundraising but designed for all to focus on the school value of Courage and to experience not being like others by having different and unusual hairstyles. This reflects the Social Justice principles of Solidarity, Human Equality and Participation among others and is an excellent illustration of how complex ideas can be adapted so that children can enact them.
  • Students can select a Social Justice course as a way of deepening their understanding as well as providing practical assistance in local communities. This course provides their sixth subject. Less academic students are able to enrol for this course, credits are available. During term one the focus is on social, economic and human sustainability.
  • A culture immersed in Social Justice and the call to service. Divided into three groups – Mercy, Liturgy and Service.
  • The Principles of Catholic Social Teaching are seen visibly around the school and are embedded into units of teaching and learning.
  • Parents are given strong encouragement to bring their children to Mass.
  • Children are involved in the Mass/liturgy.
  • The school attends (one class at a time) the Friday lunchtime parish Mass and then stays for lunch, socialising with parishioners.
  • Senior and junior classes pair up to plan, prepare and attend a class Mass twice a year.
  • The whole school attends the parish Mass held on Friday. The school has increased the number of school community celebrations at these Friday Masses such as Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Grandparent’s Day, Solidarity Day, Daffodil Day, Anzac Day and Mission Day. The student writes a personal invitation to their parents to attend.
  • The school has built up a valuable resource of illustrated picture books and novels that draw students into learning on particular themes. Teachers use this to support children in the understanding of how their faith is lived in today’s world.
  • The school radio station is run by year 5 – 8 children who share their prayers and discuss current learning and run competitions.
  • Parents are encouraged to attend a question and answer session about the church and Mass.
  • As part of the Catholic Character the school treasures all languages – classroom programmes are pitched to meet the language learning status of all students.
  • Students participate in school challenges such as Catholic Character/Service where one of the elements is adding Mass attendance as a challenge.
  • The whole school gathers in the church every Monday morning for prayer, Gospel reflection, songs and liturgy.
  • In all rooms the Gospel values are on display.
  • Faith formation material is on the school website and in newsletters and blogs.
  • Floor to ceiling crosses are embossed on the wall linings, displaying learning in RE and Catholic teaching that occurs in the classroom. Prayer focus areas are at the base of these.
  • Students who are spiritually mature are offered extension opportunities just as students with gifts in other areas have extension opportunities.
  • All children are given the opportunity to lead prayer and act as monitors in their own classrooms.

TEACHERS AND CLASSROOM PROGRAMMES

  • Use a digital programme such as See-saw to share both RE learning and Catholic character understandings with whanau. Written reports to whanau will start to reflect key learning and knowledge from strand work as well as attitudes towards learning.
  • All members of the school community are encouraged to be examples of Catholics living in faith. This is evident in:
    • Many children visiting the Church on the way to school.
    • A parish and school Hub Mass held once per term at the Saturday evening parish mass.
    • Many teachers at the school are members of the parish and participate as Ministers of the Word and Eucharist, readers, overhead projector operators and music group. Senior students take up some of these roles also.
  • Create a ‘Graduate Profile’ that includes respecting the dignity of themselves and others, be willing to serve, live faith-filled lives through living the gospel values, the Beatitudes and the Acts of Mercy and to understand and act for the common good.
  • Individual classes attend the Parish Sunday Mass – this has received glowing praise from the parish and school community.
  • A strategic goals survey of parents will rate the teaching of a range of curriculum areas – Religious Education should rank highly.
  • Each current Yr13 student writes a note for the incoming Yr7 students of the following year, welcoming them to the college and identifying key features from a student perspective. This helps with the assimilation of new students into the college culture.
  • When students enter the school at Year 7 they undertake a unit on Restorative Justice and the reasons for it from a Catholic perspective. The following Year 7 unit is an introduction to the school, including prayer, what we do at Mass, the liturgical year and the story of the school. This fits very well with the realigned 7-10 curriculum in what was previously the Year 9 unit ‘My Story, Our Story’ and provides a substantial induction for students new to Catholic schools. It is more difficult to provide this induction for students who enter the school in later years, but the DRS runs tutorials on a Thursday afternoon to which the Deans can refer students.
  • The school and the parish need to follow up on families after enrolment, to encourage them to include their children in the various programmes and to become more fully involved in the life of their faith community.
  • New families are interviewed by the Principal and shown around the school and Church, an appointment is made for the family to meet the parish priest and they are buddied- up with another Catholic family as support.
  • Early Childhood Centres are invited to the Easter Passion play and the school production each year. A preschool pack has been developed with the Special Catholic Character of the school clearly outlined.
  • Love/Aroha, Compassion/Arohanui, Respect/Whakanui, Justice/Tika, Forgiveness/Murua, Integrity/Honesty/Whakapono are known throughout the community as Mercy Values. These are true Gospel values appropriate for a Catholic school.
  • Helping induct and support new students (not new entrants) – they are introduced to concepts that would have been taught in earlier years e.g. being able to identify significant parts in the church or learning how to take part in liturgies. This programme exercises differentiation, meets specific learning needs and builds on the sense of belonging.
  • The Principal speaks to each family as they enrol about the expectation of their participation in parish as well as school life. The DRS inducts all new students into the Special Character of the school and takes them to visit the church and sends home a booklet about prayer life. The Soul Friends relationships support non-preference students, in particular, to understand the Catholic way of life.
  • Silent meditation is taught – a completely silent Year 12 retreat held to focus students on the gift of reflection about the choices they make in their life’s calling.
  • Additional service programme – this requires students to carry out community service for a minimum number of hours each year, ranging from 10 at years 7 and 8 to 20 for years 11-13. The school needs to work closely with parents. A coordinator records all student hours. Pre-requisite for Prefect candidates.
  • A Computers in home initiative is run by the school – this enables families to purchase a laptop for $50 if they have attended the required number of training sessions in its use.
  • Staff new to a Catholic Lasallian school participate in a 3-day formation programme, Heritage One, in the school holidays, focuses on the spirituality of Jean Baptiste de la Salle. They are also offered a 5-day reflective retreat focused on Catholic spirituality and the role of staff as educators in the lives of the young men they teach.
  • Each week of the term has a specific Catholic focus. Could be a feast day, one of the school’s Gospel values or a principle of Catholic social teaching. It ties the week together from the Monday whole school liturgies to Friday assemblies and immerses the community in Catholic concepts.
  • The school long term plan is based on having a ‘Catholic Curriculum’. The year’s teaching and learning is planned around the school’s Gospel values, accompanying Scripture and links to Catholic social teachings.
  • The library has engaging Catholic themed displays.
  • A deliberate display of the school virtues in every classroom. Virtues are unpacked each week and regularly referred to. Special Character Honours Awards are presented fortnightly to students who always live by the school virtues.
  • An excellent resource has been prepared for parents entitled “So you are Sending Your Daughter to a Catholic School” – a friendly guide to the Catholic tradition at Marian College. The booklet informs and expands on the Forming Faith Together Meeting and outlines the Mass, the Sacraments, Prayer in English and Te Reo, principles of Social Justice and includes timetables of Catholic Special Character events for the coming year.
  • A large printed poster in the school foyer with dates and times of up-coming liturgical celebrations and notices.
  • The school runs one full day and two half days of leadership training for year 6 students.
  • Students are shown that one way of living the gospel message is through striving.
  • The pro-active capability of Form Teachers for the pastoral care and safety of their students is enhanced by the continuity of advancing through the school from years 9 – 13 with the same students.
  • Students are encouraged to take responsibility for their own behaviour. Introduction of the STAR card (Stop, Think and Reflect) enables students who are under extreme circumstances to exit any classroom immediately and go to the Guidance Centre for assistance.
  • The introduction of senior Social Studies into the curriculum is a mechanism for a Catholic world view on global issues.
  • All staff to work on the same TCI paper eg ‘Maori Spirituality’.
  • All staff take a turn at leading daily staff prayer.
  • Tagged teachers take on responsibilities to assist the DRS in leading Catholic Character eg. create and maintain Catholic Character displays around the school, take responsibility for prayer in team meetings, work with students to plan and lead the Sunday’s Gospel or values presentation, ensure Catholic Character and RE resources are up to date, take responsibility for liturgical music within the school.
  • Tagged teachers witness to their faith, through faith conversations, role modelling and involvement in the parish.
  • Each term a Prayers resource is provided for Tutor Groups. It is used by tutor groups during Morning Prayer. Teachers new to the role are provided with a resource containing ideas for using tutor time to nourish the spiritual and social life of students.
  • The science department has a resource on Christian Values and Science Teaching – this provides scriptural quotes to demonstrate that Christianity and Science are not mutually exclusive but complementary.
  • The Principal meets with a professional supervision provider regularly. Future directions and goals are discussed along with current school issues.
  • The school has a public document showing a clear vision of what graduate from the school looks like.
  • Annual faculty reports provide a system to monitor the inclusion of a Catholic perspective within the curriculum. Heads of Faculty are asked to comment on how the faculty has worked to reflect and support the Special Character of the College.
  • Curriculum areas, other than RE, reflect Catholic Character – lessons can be linked to Catholic Character including principles of Catholic social teaching.
  • When planning units of work HOFs or lead teachers identify Catholic teaching that applies and explicitly state the core concepts in some detail so that all teachers using that unit can include the language in their classroom teaching.
  • Time is included at curriculum meetings to discuss the Bishops’ document and examples of good practice in the integration of Catholic theology into curriculum other than RE.
  • Staff are encouraged to use key Church teaching in the classroom wall displays, including quotes from Pope Francis.
  • Professional development is provided on the principles of Catholic social teaching to those teachers who have not been exposed to them.
  • A formal invitation is given to the parish priest to attend morning tea and class visits at the school on a regular basis, and this invitation is repeated regularly.

CULTURAL

  • Identify who within the local iwi is the person to discuss consultation with and work with them to identify the best way, including place, to facilitate consultation. This allows for a more authentic consultation and will provide an opportunity for true partnership and participation by all stakeholders.
  • Ways for the school to support cultural diversity:
  • Annual Māori hui, Pasifika Fono and Assyrian group
  • Cultural dance festival
  • Story hui – staff inquiry with a target group or student, knowing who they are and the gifts they bring
  • Caritas – students studied and shared their stories about Migrants and Refugees.
  • Samoan, Tongan and Tagalog Speech competition – represent the school at APPA Zones.
  • Middle Eastern, Samoan, Filipino, Tongan and Māori cultural weeks.
  • Students speak their first languages at liturgies and Masses with the English translation on the screen.
  • English Language Assistants who support the needs of second language students.
  • A closer liaison with iwi lifts the bar for te reo and kapa haka, and increases the familiarity of students to whakatau and mihi. Appoint a Whānau Dean whose key responsibility is the pastoral care of Māori students, including developing a sense of pride in their Māori identity. Waka Ama raises the profile of Maōri students.
  • As part of their graduation process Year 13 students write a letter stating what their time at the College has meant to them.
  • Staff consider Te Tiriti o Waitangi, the commitment of the Church to it, and the implications this has for the school.
  • Children are encouraged to pray in their first language then translate the prayer into English.
  • Māori parents are regularly invited to the school for Hui on topics of importance to them.
  • A whānau support group is established. The school has a radio station which is broadcast to the local community. The children operate this and share their prayers, learning, competitions and up-coming Church and school events.
  • Māori teachers on the staff support teachers with pronunciation, teach waiata and train the Kapa Haka groups.
  • Māori vocabulary is integrated into the classroom displays.
  • Te Reo Māori is incorporated into the RE curriculum through prayer and in reference to a range of topics and values/virtues.
  • Children know their school motto in Maori.
  • Waiata is incorporated into assemblies and liturgies.
  • A sustainable programme in Te Reo Māori is established across the school.
  • Principal and senior staff attend sessions on Māori spirituality and pass this learning on to the staff.
  • A Treaty of Waitangi Committee with support of whānau advisers, takes into account Māori tikanga, customs and spirituality in the daily life of the school.
  • A Māori version of the school’s Mission Statement is displayed alongside the English version.
  • Māori prayers are taught and said in classrooms, Liturgies and Masses.
  • The free supportive programme such as He Papa tikanga through Te Wananga O Aotearoa helps to stimulate a bi-cultural perspective in the classroom and is very helpful as an introduction to tikanga Māori practices.

 SACRAMENTAL PROGRAMME

  • Students are encouraged to develop their witness to faith by assisting, planning and leading in many liturgical events. The school’s Catholic Character policy and procedures states that students are given these responsibilities to ‘increase leadership roles and to develop confidence within the Church and to lead students towards mature witness and ministry in the future’.
  • The sacramental programme encourages a culture of “belonging to the school – belonging to the Church,” which assists the students to identify their next step as a person of faith.
  • The Board writes to parents whose children are of Preference 5.2, 5.3 or 5.4, and they are invited to consider having their child prepared for Baptism while s/he is at the school.
  • The parish Priest and principal visit families of children who are to be baptised – to help encourage and strengthen the relationship with the parish.
  • Families are invited to be part of a sacramental programme – the parish pastoral worker leads a sacramental programme for the children while the principal leads a programme for the parents.
  • The school works to assist students and their families on their faith and sacramental journey. The school collaborates closely with the parish to run a ‘Kids becoming Catholic’ programme – if there are 3 – 4 baptisms a year.
  • Identify all students who are eligible to make their First Communion and make personal invites to them and their families to be engaged in the parish First Communion programme, then ensure both parish and school continue to encourage students and whānau to take part in parish life, particularly Sunday Mass.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

  • The Board receives RE reports on every Religious Education strand each year. Areas of greatest progress, concept deficit (‘Hotspots’) and next steps in learning are identified as is future professional learning. These reports assist the Board to engage with the data and to have conversations about learning, theology and the direction of RE within the school.
  • To ensure the BOT understands the needs of parents, ten new families are selected each year and are contacted prior to a BOT meeting to gather feedback and suggestions.
  • The BOT and staff are commissioned at Mass at the beginning of the year in front of the wider parish.

COMMUNICATION

  • The school Facebook page is kept up to date with photos and array of special character vocabulary woven through captions to accompany and celebrate learning and school events
  • The Principal places tweets on twitter and photos on Facebook to update whānau on their young people’s activities.
  • The school uses Facebook, an app and YouTube, where appropriate, to inform parents and the community of happenings in the school.

CATHOLIC CHARACTER

  • The school proclaims the mission and Gospel of Jesus Christ. All members of the school community are encouraged to be examples of Catholics living in faith.
  • The school’s values programme has each value linked to Scripture stories and quotes. It teaches students and their families how to be living witnesses to the Gospel message. The programme is extensive and woven into the life of the school. To assist families with reinforcing these values the school newsletter gives a definition of the value, breaks its meaning open in the context of Jesus’ life and lists the success criteria. This seamless values education assists students to live the Gospel message in all aspects of their lives.
  • The school has a real focus on evangelisation. The principal and board of trustees actively market the school to people who might not have made a choice for Catholic education but who will embrace it and show a desire to be part of the Church, with the support of the parish priest. A Board member hosts evenings for parents who want to explore aspects of Catholicism.
  • A school prayer calls the students to “live lives that change the world for the better and to give eyes that see the needs of others’. This aspect of school life strengthens their understanding that there are injustices in the world that need correcting and as Catholics that is what they are called to do.
  • Spirituality is based on social justice – students fully understand that they are not just raising money but also raising awareness of the needs of others.
  • The school has a Vinnies group who collect foodstuffs and has groups that fundraise for local causes. Students enjoy being part of these groups.
  • The school has displays in the foyer on Catholic Culture and encourages students to comment on them and say what is happening in the pictures etc.
  • The principal speaks to each new family about the Catholic Character of the school and the expectation of regular attendance at Sunday Mass and living the Gospel values.
  • The school’s enrolment pack contains material on Catholic Character eg. Information on Education in Faith, the school’s Gospel values and their meaning and the school characteristics including that the students will ‘develop an awareness of God’.
  • The school publishes graduate profiles to communicate a shared understanding of what a future-oriented learner looks like. Graduate profiles describe skills, knowledge, and attitudes that students will need to participate in a range of life contexts beyond school. Catholic Character is incorporated in this profile.
  • Staff focus on the Fruits of the Holy Spirit and families apply these values at home as well. These are used as goals and guidelines for students’ personal responsibility for, and to self-manage, their behaviour.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

  • The Board of Trustees creates a strong Catholic Character policy which outlines in depth guidelines for the school on prayer, liturgies, pastoral care, curriculum, health, enrolment of students and appointment of staff.
  • The Board of Trustees develops a sound Catholic Character strategic plan. It adds actions, indicators, resources required, completion dates and success to the plan – to ensure it is a working document. Goals are then transferred to the annual plan.
  • The Board of Trustees embeds into the School Charter items that indicate an emphasis on Catholic Character eg. “We aim to develop children who have an awareness of God.”
  • The Board of Trustees sees the Board’s responsibility for the Catholic character of the school as its first and highest priority.
  • The budget for Catholic Character is split to show support of Professional Development on one line and resources on the other. This provides a higher level of transparency for the Proprietor.
  • The Board of Trustees tracks the integration of Catholic Character through the annual Faculty Reports which include a reflection on Catholic Character.
  • The BOT sets a formation time on the agenda of each BOT meeting. This strengthens their Board members’ understanding of their important role as stewards of the Catholic Character of the school.
  • The Proprietor’s Appointees meet regularly with the DRS to discuss events and issues, this information is then provided to the BOT. The principal also provides information to the Board of Trustees and this ensures the whole Board is maintaining and developing the Catholic Character of the school.

TEACHERS

  • Job descriptions contain Catholic Character expectations:
    • Principal – personal specifications around practice, knowledge, upholding of and commitment to the faith
    • DRS – Standards and indicators based on professional leadership of Catholic Character
    • Teachers – upholding the Catholic Character of the school
    • Teaching staff performance appraisal documents contain a Catholic Character quality assurance checklist
  • The DRS job description includes: standards and indicators for professional leadership of Catholic Character, Catholic Character programme management, staff management, relationship management and financial and asset management. The opportunity for self-review and appraiser review of her performance in these areas is also important.
  • The DRS is given time to effectively lead learning, facilitate liturgy and prayer and contribute to teacher appraisal, with particular reference to the Catholic Character/ RE goal in each teacher’s professional development plan.
  • Staff are committed to undertaking formation through the Catholic Institute and this has had a profound effect on the confidence and delivery of Religious Education in the school.
  • The role of tagged teachers as witnesses of faith is developed and provision of on-going professional development and formation time is made to assist these people. The diocesan office provide assistance in this regard.
  • Staff are open about their own faith journeys and are willing to discuss their faith.
  • When writing and working with staff appraisals, measurable steps are outlined to help staff achieve the Catholic Character goals they have set. With the inclusion of steps such as professional reading to be completed, resources required, date of completion and expected outcomes or success criteria. Staff will can then easily identify what steps to take next.
  • Staff are trained to notice and adjust their teaching so that each child’s learning needs and style are addressed.

PARISH

  • Collaboration with the Parish – forming a strong partnership
    • Parishioners are invited to Grandparent’s day, whether or not they have grandchildren at the school
    • The Principal and DRS work with the parish priest to provide appropriate Masses and liturgies for the children.
    • Parishioners are invited to help students in preparation of the Scripture readings and Prayers of the Faithful for weekly Masses
  • Parishioners volunteer and are trained for the school’s Reader-Tutor programme. The child and parishioner form a special bond as they read and chat to each other. The parishioner is encouraged to share their knowledge and of parish church history and also to attend all school events, Masses and liturgies.
  • Parents are educated on the Catholic Character of the school. The church environment is de-mystified so that parents can enjoy the experience.
  • The concept of being one community is built by actively working to connect families to the parish for church and social events. The school and parish have a shared plan with goals set for the year. These are centred round students being more involved in Sunday Mass and creating stewardship opportunities for them in the parish community.
  • A prayer box is provided where students can put their own personal prayers. These all go to the parish church weekly and the parishioners pray for the students’ petitions.

SACRAMENTAL PROGRAMME

  • A sacramental programme is provided to encourage those students who have a Catholic connection but are not baptised and those who are baptised but have not completed the sacraments of initiation. This assists each student to identify their next steps as a person of faith.
  • A Forming Faith programme is provided for new entrants from state schools, and reviewed after each session to determine what improvement is needed for next time.
  • Rite Of Christian Initiation For Children (RCIC) is offered to encourage non-preference children (and their families) to join the faith community.
  • Through the internal self-review process the school has highlighted a place for staff to accompany parents and their children through the sacramental programme journey.
  • The school synchronises with the parish for the teaching of the strands and modules which complement the sacramental programme. Teachers attend the celebrations to support the families.

CULTURAL

  • The school recognises the principles of the Te Tiriti Waitangi/Treaty of Waitangi and organises a regular hui to which all Māori parents are invited.
  • The BOT shows its commitment to the Te Tiriti Waitangi/Treaty of Waitangi and tangata whenua with the secondment of a Māori representative on the Board. This person works as a liaison for Māori families and a regular report is submitted to the Board.
  • Bi-cultural commitment – at Monday morning prayer assembly a Māori phrase is introduced and is practised throughout the school during that week. The sign of the cross in Māori is used throughout the school and hymns are often sung in Māori.
  • Matariki is celebrated by the whole school community and includes a prayer vigil and procession round the school ending in the prayer garden where prayers are said for those who have gone before.
  • In the classroom the teacher responds to children in English, Te Reo or Samoan, whichever is appropriate.
  • The school regularly consults with ethnic groups as part of the review process.
  • Cultural days are held when students can share their own stories and culture backgrounds. During these days, students and parents are involved in craft, music, dancing and cooking.

PASTORAL

  • The school aims to provide an emotionally and physically safe and positive environment.
  • The school establishes a Peer Support programme which will enable younger students to integrate into the life of the community.
  • A special room, purpose fitted, provides a safe and convivial space for ORS funded students. Senior students are timetabled to be in this room to socialise with the students on a regular basis which helps towards the integration of these students into the mainstream life of the school.
  • New entrant students are transitioned into school via a preparatory programme which allows them and their families to learn about and become familiar with the characteristics of Catholic education.
  • Each class has a designated parent who is the ‘go-to’ person who will coordinate any assistance needed such as transport, meals etc, if a family needs extra support in times of crisis.

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION

  • Emphasis is placed on learning the responses to the Mass so that students can participate fully in all parish and school Masses.
  • The school integrates Religious Education into learning across all curriculum areas – the literacy programme uses Bible stories in reading and writing and Caritas resources are linked with financial literacy
  • The school works with other schools in supporting each other in the delivery and review of RE.
  • The integration of the ‘Myself and Others’ module into the Health Curriculum ensures a Catholic perspective.

NEWSLETTER

  • The school newsletter lists links between the curriculum’s key competencies and how we lead our Christian lives, eg managing self is linked to how Jesus lived to bringing about the Kingdom of God.
  • The school evangelises through the weekly newsletter. The DRS includes information on the RE strands being taught and offers parents simple and meaningful ways to develop these concepts in the home.
  • Syndicate newsletters report the strand title and information about the key theological concepts, which provides an avenue for parent formation.
  • The Principal creates a thought-provoking and challenging Catholic Character message for the school newsletter
  • Wikispace (Wiki pages) and Facebook are used to help communicate with parents about activities and learning in the class.
  • The DRS writes a RE News section in each school newsletter.

WEBSITE

  • Prayer resources for parents are on the school website
  • The Board has developed the school website as another tool to help support evangelisation beyond the student cohort by ensuring that good links to Church resources are hosted.
  • A strong special character policy which outlines in depth guidelines for the school on prayer, liturgical life, pastoral, curriculum, health, enrolment of students and appointment of staff.
  • A sacramental programme to encourage those students who have a Catholic connection but are not baptised and those who are baptised but have not completed the sacraments of initiation. This will assist the student to identify their next step as a person of faith.
  • Regularly consult with ethnic groups as part of the review process.
  • Bi-cultural commitment – at Monday morning prayer assembly a Maori phrase is introduced and is practiced throughout the school during that week. The sign of the cross in Maori is used throughout the school and hymns are often sung in Maori.
  • Establish a Peer Support programme which will enable younger students to integrate into the life of the community.
  • A Travelers Group initiative provides small groups of year 9 students the arena to develop particular social skills that enable them to participate more comfortably in College life
  • The use of a special room, purpose fitted to provide a safe and convivial space for ORS funded students. Senior students are timetabled to be in this room to socialize with the students on a regular basis which helps towards the integration of these students into the mainstream life of the school.
  • The use of Achievement Standards as assessment tools has helped to strengthen the status of Religious Education and helps to motivate some reluctant students.
  • The Board of Trustees tracks the integration of special character through the annual Faculty Reports which include a reflection on special character.
  • Examples of integrated curriculum – PE class where matters of injustice in sport were incorporated into a skill based lesson.
  • The school proclaims the mission and Gospel of Jesus Christ, all members of the school community are encouraged to be examples of Catholics living in faith like Mary.
  • Parishioners volunteer and are trained for the school’s Reader-Tutor programme. The children and parishioner form a special bond as they read and chat to each other. They are encouraged to share their knowledge and church history and also to attend all Masses, liturgies and school events.
  • The Proprietor’s Appointees meet regularly with the DRS to discuss events and issues, this information is then provided to the BOT. The principal also provides information to the BOT and this ensures the whole BOT in maintaining and developing the Catholic Character of the school.
  • Job descriptions contain Catholic Character expectations
    • Principal – personal specifications around practice, knowledge and upholding of and commitment to the faith
    • DRS – Standards and indicators based on professional leadership of special character
    • Teachers – upholding the special character of the school
    • Teaching staff performance appraisal documents contain a Catholic character quality assurance checklist
  • The school’s values programme – each value is linked to Scripture stories and quotes, it teaches students and their families how to be living witnesses to the Gospel message. The programme is extensive and woven into the life of the school. To assist families with reinforcing these values the school newsletter gives a definition of the value, breaks its meaning open in the context of Jesus’ life and lists the success criteria. This seamless values education assists students to live the Gospel message in all aspects of their lives.
  • New entrant students are transitioned into school via the ‘Little Bosco’s programme which allows them and their families to learn about and become familiar with the characteristics of Catholic education.
  • Collaboration with the Parish – forming a strong partnership
    • Developing a garden within the presbytery grounds that students and parishioners work together in
    • Inviting parishioners to Grandparent’s day, whether or not they have grandchildren at the school
    • Inviting parishioners to help students in preparation of the Scripture readings and Prayers of the Faithful for weekly Masses.
  • The need for more parent education around knowledge and understanding of the Catholic character of the school. The need to welcome parents and de-mystify the church environment so that parents can enjoy the experience.
  • The school newsletter lists links between the curriculum’s key competencies and how we lead our Christian lives, eg managing self is linked to how Jesus lived and how managing self, links to bringing about the Kingdom of God. This connection between curriculum and Catholic Character is an example of best practice in an authentically integrated curriculum.
  • Introduction of Forming Faith programme for new entrants, reviewed after each session to determine what improvement is needed for next time.
  • Pupils are encouraged to attend Mass during RE classes and emphasis is placed on learning the new responses so that pupils can participate fully in all parish and school masses.
  • Each class has a designated parent who is the ‘go-to’ person who will coordinate any assistance needed such as transport, meals etc, if a family needs extra support in times of crisis.
  • The Principal and DRS work with the parish priest to provide appropriate Masses and liturgies for the children.
  • Give more time to RE lessons and the opportunity for classes to attend Mass more often.
  • Have prayer resources for parents on the school website
  • The budget for special character is split to show how it supports Professional Development on one line and resources on the other. This provides a higher level of transparency for the proprietor.
  • Have a real focus on evangelisation. The principal and board of trustees actively market the school to people who might not have made a choice for Catholic education but who will embrace it and show a desire to be part of the Church, with the support of the parish priest. A Board member hosts evenings for parents who want to explore aspects of Catholicism.
  • A commitment of staff to undertake formation through the Catholic Institute has had a profound effect on the confidence and delivery of Religious Education in the school.
  • The DRS job description includes: standards and indicators for professional leadership of special character, special character programme management, staff management, relationship management and financial and asset management. And the opportunity for self-review and appraiser review of her performance in these areas.
  • Teaching staff appraisals include RE goals based on the Professional Standards – Catholic Primary School Teachers – PN CE document. Both the job description and performance appraisal documents ensure the mission and philosophy of the school are lived out through its teachers.
  • Cultural days are held when students can share their own stories and culture backgrounds. During these days, students and parents are involved in craft, music, dancing and cooking.
  • A fence reflecting different cultures at the school borders on side of the playground.
  • Through the Positive Behaviour for Learning programme, an acronym has been developed. REAL – respectful, excelling, aware, learners. This links with the Gospel values of justice, faith, love, reconciliation, service, community, courage and hope.
  • Key pieces of scripture relating to values have been identified so that all children will know them well and learn how to relate them to their own lives.
  • Build the concept of being one community by actively working to connect families to the parish for church and social events. The school and parish also have a shared plan with goals set for the year. These are centred round students being more involved in Sunday Mass and creating stewardship opportunities for them in the parish community.
  • Develop the role of tagged teachers as witnesses of faith and provide on-going professional development and formation time to assist these people. The diocesan office can provide assistance in this regard.
  • The BOT should consider setting a formation time on the agenda of each BOT meeting, this will strengthen their understanding of their important role in the stewardship of the catholic character of the school.
  • Develop a sound special character strategic plan. Add actions, indicators, resources required, completion dates and success to the plan – this will ensure it is a working document. On completion, goals can be transferred to the annual plan.
  • Syndicate newsletters report the strand title information about the key theological concepts which provides an avenue for parent formation.
  • When writing and working with staff appraisals, consider constructing measurable steps to help staff achieve the special character goals they have set. With the inclusion of steps such as professional reading to be completed, resources required, date of completion and expected outcomes or success criteria. Staff will be able to identify what steps to take next.
  • Spirituality based on social justice – students fully understand that they are not just raising money but also raising awareness of the needs of others.
  • Through the campus minister, the ‘Seekers Programme’ offers instruction on full initiation into the Church.
  • Foster strong links with contributing schools and parishes.
  • One to one mentoring of leaders by senior staff.
  • A school prayer that calls the students to “live lives that change the world for the better and to give eyes that see the needs of others’. This aspect of school life strengthens their understanding that there are injustices in the world that need correcting and as Catholics that is what they are called to do.
  • The BOT shows its commitment to the Treaty of Waitangi and tangata whenua with the secondment of a Maori representative on the Board. This persons works as a liaison for Maori families and a regular report is submitted to the Board.
  • Have the principal lead a “Walk Through the Church” for all new families where they are guided through all the specific areas, symbols and behaviours within the church and the meaning and relevance of each is explained to them. This supports parents to feel comfortable going to church.
  • Have a prayer box into which students can put their own personal prayers into. These all go to the parish church weekly and the parishioners pray for the student’s petitions.
  • Rite Of Christian Initiation For Children (RCIC) – this programme encourages non-preference children (and their families) to join the faith community.
  • ‘Newslink’ – have a televised news broadcast where students share information and ideas.
  • Have the principal speak to each new family about the special character of the school and the expectation of regular attendance at Sunday Mass and living the Gospel values.
  • Encourage past pupils to keep in touch and to assist teachers after completion of their annual exams.
  • Give all staff the opportunity to report to the BOT on their classroom practice each year.
  • Embed into the School Charter directives that indicate an emphasis on Catholic Character eg. “We aim to develop children who have an awareness of God.”
  • The Pastoral Care Policy provides a sound basis for delivering holistic assistance.
  • The BOT members should be encouraged to attend the seminar at the Diocesan Centre, this will strengthen and deepen their understanding of their important role in the stewardship of the Catholic Character of the school.
  • Through the internal self-review process the school has highlighted a place for staff to accompany parents and their children through the sacramental programme journey.
  • The school’s enrolment pack to contain material on Catholic character eg. Information on Education in Faith, the school’s Gospel values and their meaning and the school characteristics including that the students will ‘develop an awareness of God’.
  • The religious Education Implementation Plan, which outlines the purpose of both Catholic character and Religious Education within the school, provides direction and effective practices and is an example of best practice.
  • Consult the Maori community on a family by family basis which enables a deep understanding of the needs of these families.
  • The Board should include the Religious Education Programme for Catholic primary schools in NZ under the rationale in the curriculum policy.
  • Include personal goals to assist staff in working towards gaining recognised qualifications in RE.
  • The Principal to create a thought-provoking and challenging special character message for the school newsletter.
  • Peer sharing is an effective teaching strategy.
  • Promote Catholic teaching in all curriculum areas.
  • ‘Cool to Care’ vouchers and ‘Gotcha’ rewards are issued to those students demonstrating Gospel values.
  • Staff are trained to notice and adjust their teaching so that each child’s learning needs and style are addressed.
  • The school newsletter has a ‘parent profile’ which features a photo of a parent and an acknowledgement of the way they give service at the school.
  • The BOD sees the Board’s responsibility to the Catholic character of the school as its first and highest priority.
  • Hold a school/parish mass once per term.
  • Matariki is celebrated by the whole school community and includes a prayer vigil and procession round the school ending in the prayer garden where prayers are said for those who have gone before.
  • Students are encouraged to take leadership roles at Mass, liturgies and assemblies. To increase their opportunities to lead, a three tier leadership programme is implemented – at each level there are compulsory Catholic character requirements.
  • The schools website is linked to all secondary Catholic schools in the city.
  • Integrate religious education into learning across all curriculum areas – the literacy programme uses bible stories in reading and writing and caritas resources are linked with financial literacy.
  • The use of Wikispace (Wiki pages) and Facebook to help communicate with parents about activities and learning in the class.
  • In the classroom the teacher responds to children in English, Te Reo or Samoan, whichever is appropriate.
  • In the self-review process emphasise God’s grace in the wider life of the school as well as all strands and particularly in the sacramental.
  • Ask each teacher to complete a ‘Catholic Character Reflection’ where they each commit through key objectives in upholding Catholic Character, to organize daily prayers, model Gospel values, integrate values into the curriculum and promote a caring environment.
  • Work with the parish to ensure any student given preference of enrolment under criteria 5.1 who is to be baptised completes their baptismal programme within their term of school.
  • The school evangelizes through the weekly newsletter. The DRS includes information of the RE strands being taught and offers parents simple and meaningful ways to develop these concepts in the home.
  • School integration unit planning sheets could have a specific area for Religious Education, as with the other curriculum areas.
  • Important for staff to be open about their own faith journeys and be willing to discuss their faith.
  • Work with other secondary schools in supporting each other in the delivery and review of RE.
  • Have a ‘mission box’ – this money goes to the St Vincent de Paul Society. Food items are collected and given to the parish for hampers.
  • The parish worker/priest is always invited to attend new entrant parent meetings.
  • Each Monday is called Te Reo Rahina – a school-wide initiative where the roll and prayers are said in Maori and Maori myths and legends are read to the children. Flipcharts set up in classrooms to help the children.
  • Cultural Awareness Day
  • Each Religious Education strand is assessed against the Achievement Objectives. Teachers ensure no gaps in learning before moving forward.
  • Displays in the foyer of Catholic Culture, allow students to comment on them and say what is happening in the pictures etc.
  • Create Mini Vinnies who collect foodstuffs and fundraise for local causes, children enjoy being part of these groups.
  • Incorporate religious education into visual arts, literacy and the performing arts.
  • Graduate profiles are one way that a school can communicate a shared understanding of what a future oriented learner looks like. Graduate profiles describe skills, knowledge, and attitudes that students will need to participate in a range of life contexts beyond school. Use this to reflect the special character of the school.
  • Synchronise (partnership) with the parish and teach the strands and modules which complement the sacramental programme. Teachers attend the celebrations to support the families.
  • Staff pair up and watch each other teaching Religious Education and then reflect on the lesson together after.
  • The integration of the ‘Myself and Others’ module into the Health Curriculum ensures a Catholic perspective.
  • The Board could explore the possibility of developing the school website as another tool to help support evangelisation beyond the student cohort by ensuring that good links to Church resources are hosted.
  • Students have a purple hat to test their decisions: “What would Jesus do?” “What would Jesus want me to do?”
  • The DRS needs time to effectively lead learning, facilitate liturgy and prayer and contribute to teacher appraisal and particular reference to the special character/ RE goal in each teacher’s professional development plan.
  • The newsletter is a weekly barometer of how important the Catholic character is.
  • The Maori community is consulted three times each year and Maori student achievement and needs are shared and discussed.
  • Have clear and evident wikispaces and blogs on the school website, you could even post Religious Education content to these pages. The school has designed clear digital citizen guidelines to teachers and children.
  • The DRS writes a RE News section in each school newsletter.
  • Staff focus was on the Fruits of the Holy Spirit and families applied these values at home as well. These were used as goals and guidelines for children’s personal responsibility for, and to self-manage their Behaviour.
  • The school recognises the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi – organizes a hui to which all Maori parents are invited.
  • Through the teaching of Beatitudes, the school aims to provide an emotionally and physically safe and positive environment.
  • The identified values at school are derived from the Beatitudes. In the playround there are impressive murals depicting some of these values.